Frau Mauro’s upside down world

Looking south

Alex Wrottesley of Geovation sent me this beautiful 15th century world map that he came across in Florence

Fra’ Mauro, a Camaldolese monk, was active in Venice toward the mid-fifteenth century. His world map depicts the image of the Earth prevailing before the discovery of America. Based on literary texts that conveyed the geographic information then available, the original map is now in the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana of Venice.


Spotted at the the Museo Galileo in Florence where they display a full-scale facsimile.”

I like the idea of a south orientated map, it challenges my presumptions about maps, geography and the world order.

If you want to learn a bit more about this map have a look here

Shellmounds

Michael Terner sent us this medallion map from Southern California

… a “medallion map” that was placed on a pedestrian bridge that crosses a small tributary of the San Francisco Bay in San Mateo, CA (where my mother lives). The medallion shows the historic location of Seashell Mounds left by the Native Americans who previously inhabited this part of California; and many of the mounds were found along this creek. The first pic is of the map in its context, which we encountered on a shoreline walk; the second pic is a closeup of the somewhat interesting title of the map.

A bit of context to shellmounds, if you are interested.

Thames on the pavement

Gary Gale sent us this pic of a map on the pavement in Richmond

“Saw this this morning in Richmond. It’s a map of the Thames near Richmond to mark the 50th anniversary of the Richmond Society. It’s been there since 2007 but it’s so understated and part of the pavement that you can walk over it almost without noticing. Seems I’ve done that quite a few times myself!”

Contours on a t-shirt

“So this is the uphill bit?”

Paul Hardy sent us this contour map on a t-shirt

“I don’t know if this image qualifies – the location is certainly wild, being on the coast of Malta with the island in the background where St Paul was shipwrecked. The map was on the shirt of a fellow rambler on the same group walking holiday (on Christmas Day!). She didn’t know where in the world the contour topography was supposed to represent, and would like to know – any ideas?”